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What my unconscious bias taught me about diversity

It isn’t enough to recognize other people have unconscious biases. You have to recognize yours and how deal with them. Part of understanding the role of unconscious bias in the workplace is admitting to yourself that you have biases too. Once you've accepted it, you can take steps to overcome those biases and embrace workplace diversity.

Related: Managing Unconscious Bias in The Workplace

Regarding workplace biases, managers could create objective boundaries around a job description. These boundaries make it harder for our biases to creep in, and we also become less biased when there’s appropriate scrutiny about our decisions. The idea is that we all behave better when we know we’re being watched.

Related: Building Trust and Employee Engagement Webinar

Regarding workplace biases, managers could create objective boundaries around a job description. These boundaries make it harder for our biases to creep in, and we also become less biased when there’s appropriate scrutiny about our decisions. The idea is that we all behave better when we know we’re being watched.

Dismantling bias is slow and perilous work. It involves forcing people out of their comfort zones and helping them to get to know the kind of people they don’t usually spend time with.

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ABOUT JIM WOODS

Jim Woods is president and senior consultant of Woods Kovalova Group. He is a former U.S. Navy Seabee and has been a board member to numerous organizations. For more than 25 years, he has been a coach, consultant, facilitator, and trainer to leaders and individuals who desire to transform their lives and business. Jim is happily married and grandfather to five. He has designed and taught classes on leadership mastery, cultivating presence, embodied leadership and building confidence. Jim’s corporate clients include Whirlpool, U.S. Army, and Berkshire Hathaway. Jim has also taught fifth grade math and science and been a university professor. He holds a master’s degree in organizational development and human resources.